(AP) – State Stories

| October 2, 2012
Print Friendly

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Supporters of a Missouri ballot measure changing the selection process for top judges say they won’t campaign for it because they don’t like the summary that voters will see. Proponents said Today that they would not appeal a court ruling rejecting their challenge to the official ballot summary prepared by Secretary of State Robin Carnahan’s office. They issued a statement saying they still believe Carnahan’s summary is biased against the measure. Because of that, supporters said they won’t spend money on a traditional campaign for the measure.

ST. CHARLES, Mo. (AP) — The former president of US Fidelis has been sentenced to eight years in prison on state charges of stealing and fraud. Darain Atkinson was sentenced Monday in St. Charles. He was sentenced to eight years on federal charges on Sept 25, and the terms will be served concurrently in a federal prison. The 47-year-old co-founded the auto service contract seller with his 42-year-old brother, Cory Atkinson. The younger Atkinson is sentenced to four years on state charges and 40 months on federal charges, also to be served concurrently. The Wentzville, Mo.-based US Fidelis collapsed in 2009 and filed for bankruptcy in 2010 amid accusations of fraud.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A defense attorney in a southwest Missouri case says federal prosecutors should not be allowed to use intimate relations between her client and his wife as proof that the man sexually abuses women. Edward and Marilyn Bagley are scheduled for trial in February on a number of federal charges, including sex trafficking and forced labor trafficking. Prosecutors say Ed Bagley groomed a woman to become his sex slave when she was a teenager, then tortured her for years. The Bagleys claim the woman asked to become part of their kinky BDSM lifestyle.

ST. LOUIS (AP) — A federal judge has refused to issue a preliminary injunction against a Missouri law making it a crime to disturb worship services. The law makes it a misdemeanor to intentionally disturb or interrupt a “house of worship” with profane language, rude or indecent behavior or noise. It carries a penalty of up to six months in jail and a $500 fine. Attorneys for the American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit on behalf of two individuals and two groups that picket outside churches. They contend the law is vague and infringes upon free speech rights. Senior U.S. District Judge E. Richard Webber last week denied the request for preliminary injunction. Critics of the law said Today they will move forward with the case.

BLOOMFIELD, Mo. (AP) — A Missouri State Highway Patrol criminologist says a southeast Missouri man had synthetic drugs in his system when he allegedly shot and killed his own son. A preliminary hearing was Monday in Stoddard County for 40-year-old Charles Goforth of Catron, accused of second-degree murder in the May shooting of his son, 20-year-old Patrick. Patrol criminologist Emily Smelser testified that the substance alpha-PVP was found in both urine and blood samples of Charles Goforth. Alpha-PVP is commonly marketed as a so-called “bath salt.” The judge ruled there was enough evidence for the trial to proceed. Arraignment is Oct. 17.

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The Missouri State Treasurer’s office is holding nearly $700 million in unclaimed property, and Treasurer Clint Zweifel (ZWY’-ful) is reaching out to those with Alzheimer’s disease who may be due part of that money. Zweifel was in St. Louis Today to announce an initiative with the Alzheimer’s Association St. Louis Chapter and AARP Missouri. He says his staff routinely deals with people with Alzheimer’s, or their families, concerning unclaimed property. Zweifel says that as part of his effort his office will provide educational resources, host meetings and offer a staff member to talk to caregivers and health care providers who work with families affected by Alzheimer’s.

Category: News, State News