Hands Only CPR Class

| February 12, 2014
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The Livingston County Health Center is offering, a “Hands Only,” CPR class this Friday at noon.

Click to hear KMZU’s Mike Stone talk with Class spokesperson Sherry Weldon:

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Press Release from the Livingston County Health Center

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In recognition of American Heart Month, Livingston County Health Center is offering “Hands-Only” CPR at their office on this Friday, February 14th over the noon hour.   Those interested should call to reserve a spot, as there are only ten kits available per session.  Those who can’t come at noon should call to find out about an alternate time on Friday.  If we receive an overwhelming response, more sessions may be added during the day or at a future date.

Hands-Only CPR is CPR without mouth-to-mouth breaths. It is recommended for use by people who see a teen or adult suddenly collapse in an “out-of-hospital” setting (such as at home, at work or in a park). It consists of two easy steps:

·         Call 9-1-1 (or send someone to do that).

·         Push hard and fast in the center of the chest.

Every five years, the American Heart Association publishes updated guidelines for CPR and emergency cardiovascular care. These guidelines reflect a thorough review of current science by international experts. The 2010 guidelines reported that in studies of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, adults who received Hands-Only CPR from a bystander were more likely to survive than those who didn’t receive any type of CPR from a bystander. In other studies, survival rates of adults with cardiac arrest treated by people who weren’t healthcare professionals were similar with either Hands-Only CPR or conventional CPR.

When interviewed, bystanders said panic was the major obstacle to performing CPR. The simpler Hands-Only technique may help overcome panic and hesitation to act.

Learning basic CPR skills may help save the life of a loved one in case of heart attack.

Call 646-5506 to find out more, or reserve your spot.

All services of the health center are provided on a non-discriminatory basis.

Category: Local News, News