Although warm, wet weather aided crop development across the northern portion of the state, the southern districts experienced less than one inch of rain, matched with warm temps, creating a very dry environment. Most crops were planted, but there were 5.2 days suitable for fieldwork, keeping producers busy spraying and harvesting both wheat and hay.
Corn silked and beyond was 17 percent, 8 days behind last year, and 1 week behind the 5-year average. Corn condition was 10 percent poor to very poor, 25 percent fair, 65 percent good to excellent.
Soybeans planted were 96 percent complete, nearly the same as last year, and 2 days ahead of normal. Soybeans emerged were 90 percent, 2 days ahead of last year, and 3 days ahead of normal. Soybean blooming and beyond was 4 percent, 4 days behind last year and the normal pace. Condition was slightly better than corn with soybeans rating 7 percent poor to very poor, 28 percent fair, and 65 percent good to excellent.
Sorghum planting was nearly complete moving to 96 percent, nearly the same as last years pace and the 5 year average. Sorghum heading was only beginning with 1 percent headed state-wide, with most progress in the northwest and west-central districts. Sorghum condition was just 1 percent poor, 31 percent fair,and 68 percent good to excellent.
Winter wheat harvest continued at 5 days ahead of the normal pace, advancing 25 points from last week up to 88 percent, nearly the same as last year.
Alfalfa hay 1st cutting was 94 percent, nearly the same as 2010 and the 5 year average. 2nd cutting was at 45 percent, 2 days ahead of last year, but 1 day ahead of normal. Other hay cut was 74 percent nearly the same as last years pace and the 5 year average.
Dry conditions across the central and southern districts decreased pasture conditions somewhat to 6 percent poor, 35 percent fair, and 59 percent good to excellent. Hay and other roughage supply state-wide was considered 7 percent short, 87 percent adequate, and 6 percent surplus.